Great is Thy Faithfulness

Some times, I worry about the little (and not-so-little) stuff.

I worry our house won't sell (if you don't know about the house situation, it's a long story - summary: there is a house and it needs to be sold).

I worry about whether or not there will be more grant funding for my job. I worry if we do get funding, I'll never want to have children and to leave. If we don't get funding, I worry about not having a job.

Some times, I worry about health stuff. I worry that my only living grandparent is sick. I worry about the implications of losing her. As John Mayer said, 
"Don't know how else to say it, 
don't want to see my parents grow old. 
One generation's length away 
from finding life out on my own."

I worry about the idea of friends moving away, about stuff at church, at life decisions. I worry about changes. It's easy to do.

Then, I remember.

I remember opening my refrigerator when we had a friend and his son living with us. I remember thinking that the grocery budget was gone that month. I remember God providing food like mana, in huge quantities  and all four of us being fed for a week. 

I see my niece and nephew, growing up strong and healthy, who do not want for anything. If you ask their parents how they provide for them, after losing their business 3 years ago, they would probably tell you God's grace.

On my refrigerator, I keep my grandmother's Christmas card. Part of me is scared it will be the last one I ever receive from her. But the real reason I keep it is this --

She writes...
"One Sign Of My Golden Years:
I'm sending out more get well cards and sympathy card than birthday cards"
Underneath that, with an adorable stamp (photo below) she writes:
"Some day we will all be together... singing Great is Thy Faithfulness! {I have my Texas skirt on}"

Then, I remember that the God who has been faithful to my grandmother, my parents, to the ancient Israelites and to generations of the Church, is my God. He is faithful. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

a full discloser

when your birthday doesn't mean anything anymore

a blog about a blog